The Best Boilers in 2019

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The best boiler in 2019 is the Viessmann Vitodens 200-W system/combi

A new boiler can save you up to £315 per year on your energy bills

Fill in the form above for free boiler quotes from our qualified installers


Boilers play an incredibly important role in your home, providing you with hot water and central heating – two of the inventions which fundamentally separate us from the harsh realities of nature.

Your boiler is an unsung hero, just getting on with a crucial yet unspectacular job, day after day, with no thoughts of recognition – a bit like your belt. It doesn’t crave the adoration given to your microwave, your kettle, or your new haircut. And it’s only when your boiler breaks that you realise how vital it is.

But despite the potentially urgent situation, you don’t want to make an impulse buy. Boilers typically last 10-15 years, so if you’re in the market, you want to get right – plus it can be expensive to replace them.

Buying one can cost anywhere from £540 to £11,500, with installation adding an extra £1,500 to £3,300. However, a new boiler can also save you up to £315 per year.

You don’t want to break the bank, but if you’re buying a boiler in 2019, you’ll want it to be one of the best. So how do you choose between the many types of boilers out there?

Luckily, we’ve got you covered. Read on to find out about the many different types of boiler, which kind of boiler we recommend for your home, and which are the best boilers for you. If you fill in this form you can also get free, top quality quotes.

a boiler fires up


The Best Boilers in 2019: what’s on this page?

Head straight to a specific section by clicking the links below.


What is the best boiler?

The best boiler in 2019 is the Viessmann Vitodens 200-W. With a 35kW output, this AA-rated German product is ready to fulfil all your heating needs – and with a market-leading 98% ErP efficiency, its already extremely reasonable price will look even better after you account for your energy bill savings.

Viessmann has 4.5 stars on Reviews.co.uk, and will give you a five-year warranty on the Vitodens 200-W if you use a Viessmann-trained tradesman and register the machine on the Viessmann Installer Portal.

This excellent example of modern engineering also wins our award for the best condensing boiler, since all new boilers must be condensing in these forward-thinking times we live in.

(All prices come from PlumbNation.co.uk.)

Statistic
Viessmann Vitodens 200-W
ErP rating (heat & water)
AA
Decibels
51
ErP efficiency
98%
Kilowatts
35
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
<39
Size (mm)
850 x 450 x 360
Weight (kg)
48
Price
£1,645.47

Information updated in August 2019.


Which boiler is best for your type of home?

Statistic
Flat
2 bedrooms
3 bedrooms
Large house
Boiler name
Baxi 224
Ideal Logic+
Viessmann Vitodens 100-W
Vaillant ecoTEC plus 435
Type
Combi
Combi
System
Conventional
ErP rating
AA
AA
A
A
Decibels
48
46
49
53
ErP efficiency
93%
94%
97%
94%
Kilowatts
24
30
35
35
Nitrogen oxides (mg/kWh)
38
25
<39
32
Size (mm)
700 x 395 x 279
700 x 395 x 278
700 x 400 x 350
602 x 375 x 320
Weight (kg)
26
29.3
37
23
Price
£613.64
£832.67
£1,153.38
£1,572.99

Information updated in August 2019.

Don’t worry: if you’re looking for more information about the best boilers by type (combi, conventional, system, etc.), that section is coming up later, along with explanations of how each type differs – the whole shebang, basically.


What are the best boiler brands?

When you’re buying one of the best boilers in 2019, they have to be made and sold by the best companies around. There’s no sense in accepting anything else.

Viessmann, Ideal, and Baxi are our top picks for the most reliable, top quality boiler brands. They’ve come out on top in almost all of our rankings, all offer 10-year warranties, and all have a Trustpilot rating of 8.6 or higher.

If you’re looking for a biomass or oil boiler, Grant UK is the company for you. Its machines are top dog in these sectors, plus they come with an industry-leading Trustpilot rating of 9.3, and decent warranties too. Grant UK told The Eco Experts that you can expect a warranty of two years, or five years if you pay extra (£264 for a conventional boiler, £330 for a combi).

If you use one of Grant’s G1 installers to fit your new boiler, you can get a free five-year warranty. You can even get a ten-year warranty if you’re buying a VortexBlue, which we’ve picked as the best oil boiler out there.

However, you should think long and hard about whether you need a biomass or oil boiler over a gas or electric model. It’s not always worth it – and oil can be extremely bad for the climate.

Worcester Bosch, Vaillant, and Glow-worm (which is owned by Vaillant) are also top-tier companies that have achieved a score of 9 or above on Trustpilot after thousands of reviews. With nearly three centuries of experience between them, they deserve your attention too. Soon enough, they may reach the top of some of our categories.


What makes a boiler the best boiler?

When you’re rummaging through all the different types of boiler, it can get confusing. All you want is to get your heating and hot water sorted, and not have to think about it again for at least a decade.

But to reach that place of bliss, tranquility, and ignoring the cumbersome box that keeps you comfortable 24/7, you need to pick one of the best boilers. You can do this by choosing a model that fits your budget, matches your size and heating needs, and will save you money by being energy efficient. We’ve therefore judged the best boilers in 2019 based on the following criteria:

ErP rating: This system, created by the European Union, gives a grade to energy-related products (ErP) like boilers for their central heating and hot water capabilities. You should aim for an A rating in both categories.

ErP efficiency: All boilers installed in the UK have to legally be at least 92% efficient in their fuel use – but you should aim for as close to 100% as you can, obviously.

Decibels: Any decibel level below 80dB is healthy for humans, but ideally, you want your boiler – the Neville Longbottom of household appliances – to be as quiet as possible. Under 50dB is a good target.

Kilowatts: This measures how much energy your boiler can use to heat your home. Smaller places will need a boiler up to 24kW, while larger homes may require 35kW or more.

Nitrogen oxides: Measured in milligrams per kilowatt-hour, this statistic shows the amount of harmful nitrogen oxides released into the atmosphere by your boiler. Less than 30 is ideal, 35 or over is a problem, and more than 40 is extremely bad.

Size: Make sure to work out how much space you have, then find a boiler which matches that.


How to pick the right boiler for you

Before you spend potentially thousands on your next boiler, there are some important factors you’ll want to consider. These include:

• How many bedrooms and bathrooms you have

• Your budget

• Whether you’re connected to the gas grid

• How much space you have for a boiler

• How environmentally friendly you want your boiler to be

Whatever your needs, you can receive help on this journey to a better boiler by getting in contact with our professional installers.

this is everything to consider before you get a new boiler

The different types of boiler

• Combi
• System
• Conventional
• Oil
• Electric
• Biomass

At this point, you’ll probably be asking: which models are the best boilers in 2019? How much do they cost? And what size boiler do I need? But before we get to those important questions, we should take a look through all the types of boilers, so that you’re fully prepared.

You may have an image of a boiler in your head – a large box, usually rectangular or cylindrical, surrounded by pipes and hidden from sight. It’s not particularly spectacular, but within this unremarkable shape lies countless unique capabilities and possibilities.

Some are powered by fossil fuels – gas, oil, or Liquid Propane Gas (LPG) – while some run on wood pellets, or the trees you chopped down yourself today in the forest. There are conventional boilers, which work best in large homes; the system boiler, their best-of-both-worlds cousin; and combi boilers, which can heat you up any time – though not always to the same standard.

All have their advantages and disadvantages; all cost a wide range of prices; all have their own efficiency ratings, abilities, and physical attributes. Let’s dig into their differences.


Combi boiler

These machines are geared for action. Combi boilers can provide unlimited hot water at a moment’s notice, because unlike conventional and system boilers, they don’t rely on a cold water tank or a hot water cylinder.

Instead, when you turn a tap, cold water rushes in from the mains to your combi boiler, where it goes through a heat exchanger and is quickly transformed into the hot shower of your dreams.

Central heating works the same way, with cold water from the mains being heated up and sent straight to your radiators whenever you need it.

Combi boilers don’t need to prepare or refuel before the big show – they’re ready to go when you need them. To quote the poet Shakira: whenever, wherever (as long as they’re connected to the right pipes).

One advantage of combi boilers is that they only heat the water you use, so they generally cut your energy bills. Their compact nature also means they’re usually easier to install and take up less space, which is great for smaller homes.

They can also be powered by oil, gas, electricity, or LPG, allowing you to use a combi boiler even if you’re not connected to the gas grid.

The main disadvantage of combi models is that water coming out of multiple places at once may reduce water pressure – so if someone’s trying to clean the dishes while you’re showering, that could cause problems. Don’t worry, though – if you need to supply multiple bathrooms at once, there are combi boilers on the market which are up to the challenge.

Your water may take a little time to heat up, and if your mains pressure isn’t good, your shower’s water pressure won’t be either. Combi boilers also don’t work well with solar panels – at least compared to the other main types of boilers – which reduces your ability to easily cut your carbon emissions.

Plus, if your combi boiler breaks down, you’ll have no built-in back-up and no reserves of hot water.

a man looks aghast after his hot water supply shuts off


Conventional boiler

Also known as regular or heat-only boilers, conventional boilers take up the most space of any mainstream boiler – however, they can also get everyone in your home hot under the collar, all at once. They can supply three or four bathrooms with no trouble and no reduction in water pressure, making them ideal for larger homes.

You’ll probably need to install two tanks in your loft: a cold water tank, which draws water from the mains and distributes it, and a feed and expansion tank, which keeps your water levels consistent.

The water is heated by your boiler whenever you choose (though doing it while everyone’s asleep seems wise), and stored in a hot water cylinder. It can then fulfil your shower or heating needs whenever you choose – although it’s limited by how much water is in the cylinder.

On the plus side, water pressure will stay the same no matter how many taps or showers are on, so you don’t need to get into arguments with anyone else in the house about who ruined whose shower. Conventional boilers also combine well with solar panels, and you can fit the cylinder with an electrical immersion heater as a failsafe for if the boiler breaks.

The main negative is that with two tanks, a hot water cylinder, and a boiler, a conventional boiler takes up much more room, and is more difficult and costly to install than other heating systems. You also need to decide how much hot water you want, and when – and may be left with nose icicles or expensive bills if you get this wrong.


System boiler

Goldilocks would love a system boiler – after all, it’s the in-between. Depending on your perspective and needs, you may see it as being caught between worlds, or as a happy medium: not too combi, not too conventional – just right.

System boilers take their water supply directly from the mains, like a combi, then heat it up and store it in a hot water cylinder, like a conventional boiler. This means there’s no need for an extra couple of tanks in your loft, which saves on space, but you’ll still have a higher capacity than combi owners.

If you need hot water for two bathrooms, rather than three or four, a system boiler may be the way to go.

The best news when it comes to system boilers is that their water pressure is consistent (like conventional boilers), without you having to make the space in your home and bank account for two water tanks. It’s also compatible with solar power, which is always a great option.

The worst news is a repeat of the drawbacks of having a conventional boiler: a system boiler takes up more space than a combi, you have to heat the water up in advance, and the hot water can run out.


Condensing boilers

In 2007, the law was changed to require that all new boilers must be condensing. The British government explained that it had taken this step because “around 16% of the carbon dioxide that the UK produces comes from the gas and oil boilers that we use to heat our homes.”

If a boiler is condensing, that means it has a Flue Gas Recovery System. Instead of releasing waste gases into the atmosphere, this ingenious piece of hardware captures them, so that it can generate as much heat as possible, using what would otherwise have been wasted.

Because of this, condensing boilers are more environmentally friendly, more energy efficient, and will save you money on your bills. Don’t just take our word for it – according to Which, condensing boilers are typically at least 25% more efficient than non-condensing models.

a woman smiles in front of a boiler


Gas boilers

These boilers use a gas supply to heat water. This is either instantly sent to act as central heating or warm water, or stored in a hot water tank for later use. Gas boilers come in pretty much every mainstream variety, and are the most popular type of boiler.

They’re perfect if you’re part of the great majority of people who are connected to the gas grid – though if you’re not, they’re pretty much completely unworkable.


Oil boilers

As of 2015, an estimated 10% of households in the UK weren’t connected to the gas grid, according to government data. That’s about 2.7 million homes which have to rely on alternative sources, such as oil.

Oil is just another source of fuel, though in most cases, a very environmentally unfriendly one. Oil boilers use the fuel to heat a container of water – either directly from your mains or in a storage tank – and that water is disseminated throughout your home for all your hygiene and heating needs.

Oil boilers are in the same ballpark as other models when it comes to efficiency, while oil is cheaper than most fuels. They’re still more expensive than gas boilers, though, which means you should probably use gas if you can. They also release up to seven times as many milligrams of damaging nitrogen oxides into the atmosphere as gas boilers.

The other main drawback of using an oil boiler is that you’ll need a storage tank to hold all the oil, and regular deliveries to ensure that you never run out. Tanks generally hold between six and nine months’ worth of oil, so bear this in mind if you opt to use it.

If you overestimate the amount you’ll need, your energy bills will be unnecessarily expensive, while you may be stuck with a freezing home and no hot water if you don’t order enough. Oil isn’t easy to acquire at short notice, either.


Wood-burning boilers

If you don’t have a gas grid connection, or if you simply want to make your home more environmentally friendly and battle climate change, you can use firewood to heat your home and water. This method works best if you have a ready supply of trees just waiting to be cut down and used for fuel.

However, even if you don’t live in a forest as a lumberjack, wood still has its advantages. As well as being potentially sustainable, it’s also affordable, and doesn’t have the same dramatic price fluctuations that fossil fuels sometimes suffer from.

If it was good enough for every single one of your ancestors up until a couple of centuries ago, it could work for you too.


Biomass boilers

Biomass boilers work in much the same way as any other, except they usually run off wood pellets or chips. They can sometimes automate the process, meaning you won’t have to throw some extra wood on every time you want to grab a quick shower.

You’ll need somewhere to store the fuel, as you would with a wood-burning boiler or oil boiler, and a biomass boiler is expensive – but you can get paid for using one.

Biomass boilers are one of the few energy sources which allow you to qualify for the government’s Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive, which pays homeowners potentially thousands of pounds for using renewable energy.

However, Dr Mathew Heal, who is the chair of atmospheric chemistry at Edinburgh University, told The Eco Experts that you shouldn’t go for a biomass boiler unless it’s your only good option.

“My personal view is that people should be very reticent about going out and buying biomass boilers, because the regulations aren’t that stringent. By using these boilers in a domestic setting, you are contributing to local air pollution,” he explained.

“If you don’t need it, I think you should be discouraged.”

He added that when it comes to air pollutants, “it doesn’t matter what fuel you’re using: all combustion has the potential to release NOx (nitrogen oxide) emissions. It all depends on the burning process.

“The trajectory we’re going on is that electricity is getting cleaner, so using electricity to heat your home has the potential to be much cleaner even than a biomass boiler.”

a biomass boiler burns wood pellets


Electric boilers

Electric boilers represent another alternative if you’re one of the millions not connected to the gas grid. You won’t need to arrange supplies of wood, oil or anything else – your new boiler will function like a combi gas boiler, except it’ll use your pre-existing electricity source to heat your water and home instead.

Because of this, electric boilers have the potential to be more environmentally friendly than other models. If your electricity already comes from renewable sources like solar or wind, you won’t be adding carbon emissions with your boiler.

Electricity can be a more expensive source of heat than gas, and electric boilers are of course susceptible to power cuts. However, they can also be more energy efficient, cheaper to install, and quieter than their rivals.


Free-standing boilers

Also known as floor-standing or floor-mounted boilers, free-standing boilers are larger machines that aren’t quite as friendly with gravity as their wall-mounted counterparts.

They can supply more hot water, but as a result of their build, they’re too heavy to be shut away in a small cabinet halfway up the wall, and will usually need a cupboard, kitchen cabinet, or small room to themselves.

This means there’s less flexibility in terms of where they can go – but usually, if your home is big enough to need a free-standing boiler, it’ll have enough space for one.

As well as generally having a larger water capacity than wall-mounted boilers, they also often possess a higher top temperature. This can mean higher energy bills as they use more electricity, but if you need to supply hot water and heat to multiple bedrooms, bathrooms, and people, it might be worth it.


Wall-mounted boilers

Wall-mounted boilers are typically smaller, sleeker, and more modern. Most new boilers come in this variety, partly because they’re easier to find space for, and partly because of the increasing need in the UK for small homes which don’t need (and can’t fit) free-standing boilers.

Of course, you’ll want the boiler that’s best for your specific needs – and if your home is a flat or a one-bedroom house, that probably means getting a wall-mounted boiler. After all, you don’t need a free-standing behemoth extracting space and money from you for no good reason.

Did You Know?

The cost of heating your home, particularly during the colder winter months, makes up about 60% of energy bills. Make sure you’re not ramping up your energy bills by holding on to your old boiler — fill in this short form to get a quote from one of our many professional installers.


Best boilers by house type

All prices come from PlumbNation.co.uk – apart from the biomass boilers, which come from TravisPerkins.co.uk and Wolseley.co.uk – and are accurate as of August 2019.

Best boiler for a flat: Baxi 224 Combi (£614)

If you live in a small flat, a 20-24kW combi gas boiler is the one for you – as long as you’re connected to the gas grid. If you’re not, or if you’re concerned about reducing your carbon emissions, then an electric, wood-burning, or biomass boiler might be the one for you.

The gas-connected majority of you should go for the Baxi 224 Combi. This 24kW combi gas boiler should cover all your needs, with enough power to comfortably heat one or two bedrooms, and supply water for one bathroom. It’ll also fit in your cupboard, which is a must.

It’s noticeably cheaper than its immediate competitors, while maintaining a 93% efficiency rate that means you’ll save money in the long run.

However, if you’d like to go slightly greener but still run a gas combi, the Ideal Logic+ Combi (£792) is the best eco-friendly model by far in the 24kW category – as shown by its lower nitrogen oxide emissions. Both are AA-rated under the ErP Directive, so you’ll have a high quality, affordable product no matter which one you choose.

Statistic
Baxi 224 Combi
Ideal Logic+ Combi
ErP rating (heat & water)
AA
AA
Decibels
48
48
ErP efficiency
93%
94%
Kilowatts
24
24
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
38
28
Size (mm)
700 x 395 x 279
700 x 395 x 278
Weight (kg)
26
34
Price
£613.64
£791.98

Information updated in August 2019.

Best boiler for a two-bedroom house: Ideal Logic+ Combi 30kW

For a two-bedroom house, you’ll want to travel slightly higher up the range and go for a combi boiler capable of producing up to 30kW, which will fulfil all your water and heating needs at once.

As well as being one of the best boilers in 2019, Ideal’s Logic+ Combi 30kW is perfect for anyone with two bedrooms. It’s efficient with its fuel, while making sure your home stays relatively quiet – you’ll barely notice its friendly 46dB hum.

The Logic+ Combi is also lighter and slighter than most of its competitors, meaning you can easily put it out of sight while it gets on with doing a top-notch job. It produces a smaller amount of harmful gases than many other machines, too – and all for hundreds of pounds less than similar top-of-the-range models.

Statistic
Ideal Logic+ Combi 30kW
ErP rating (heat & water)
AA
Decibels
46
ErP efficiency
94%
Kilowatts
30
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
<25
Size (mm)
700 x 395 x 278
Weight (kg)
29.3
Price
£832.67

Information updated in August 2019.

Best boiler for a three-bedroom house: Viessmann Vitodens 100-W 35kW System Boiler

The average house has three bedrooms, according to a study conducted by LABC Warranty. That means that in all probability, many of you will be searching for a boiler which fits this type of home – and the good news is, finding one couldn’t be simpler.

You’ll need a machine with an output between 30 and 35kW – a top-quality system boiler or combi boiler would do the job, but system models would have the advantage of keeping some water in reserve. This is important if your water pressure can’t handle more than one person showering at the same time.

And there’s no question that in terms of system boilers, the Viessmann Vitodens 100-W is the best choice for a three-bedroom house. Its 97% efficiency rate and small size – particularly when compared to rivals like the otherwise impressive Baxi Megaflo System – help set it apart from the rest.

It’s lighter than most, quieter than most, and certainly costs less than most. This German company – which has more than 100 years of experience, and sponsors Huddersfield Town Football Club – has done it again.

Statistic
Viessmann Vitodens 100-W
ErP rating (heat & water)
A
Decibels
49
ErP efficiency
97%
Kilowatts
35
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
<39
Size (mm)
700 x 400 x 350
Weight (kg)
37
Price
£1,153.38

Information updated in August 2019.

Best boiler for a large house: Vaillant ecoTEC plus 435

When you have a big home, you need a big boiler with the ability to warm every nook and cranny. No-one wants to own one of those houses you read about in Victorian novels, where it’s so cold that everyone gathers around the fire for fear of contracting smallpox.

To achieve this crucial goal, you’ll generally need a conventional boiler which produces more than 30kW. Don’t be fooled by the ‘conventional’ tag – as explained above, these machines are nothing if not extraordinary, spreading joy and warmth to many people at once without losing water pressure. If you have the space, a conventional boiler is a must.

On that note, please join us in welcoming Vaillant’s ecoTEC plus 435 to the top tier. Conventional boilers are usually heavy and cumbersome, but this model is relatively light, weighing just a third as much as the average woman in the UK. Its ErP efficiency and rating are also top-notch.

You could always go for machines like Ideal’s Mexico HE36 or Evomax 40kW, and they do have their advantages; the Evomax is more efficient, while the Mexico is less harmful for the climate – but they’re also at least £1,000 more expensive.

Statistic
Vaillant ecoTEC plus 435
ErP rating (heat & water)
A
Decibels
53
ErP efficiency
94%
Kilowatts
35
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
32
Size (mm)
602 x 375 x 320
Weight (kg)
23
Price
£1,572.99

Information updated in August 2019.


The best boilers in every category

We’ve helped you work out which boiler is right for your home – but what if your home doesn’t fit within traditional definitions? What if it defies labels? What if you know exactly what type of boiler you want, but don’t know how to pick the right boiler in that category?

No problem. Once again, we’ve got all the latest and most in-depth answers about which combi has you covered, which system is sizzling, and which biomass is brilliant – no matter your budget. If there’s any repetition in here, it’s because some of these cutting-edge boilers fit into more than one category – just like you.

Best combi boiler: Viessmann Vitodens 200-W (35kW)

Statistic
Viessmann Vitodens 200-W
ErP rating (heat & water)
AA
Decibels
51
ErP efficiency
98%
Kilowatts
35
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
<39
Size (mm)
850 x 450 x 360
Weight (kg)
48
Price
£1,645.47

Information updated in August 2019.

Best budget combi boiler: Baxi 224 Combi (24kW)

Statistic
Baxi 224 Combi
ErP rating (heat & water)
AA
Decibels
48
ErP efficiency
93%
Kilowatts
24
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
38
Size (mm)
700 x 395 x 279
Weight (kg)
26
Price
£613.64

Information updated in August 2019.

Best gas boiler: Ideal Evomax 40kW

Statistic
Ideal Evomax 40kW
ErP rating (heat & water)
A
Decibels
53
ErP efficiency
96.2%
Kilowatts
40
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
39.1
Size (mm)
850 x 360 x 500
Weight (kg)
49
Price
£2,518.98

Information updated in August 2019.

Best budget gas boiler: Ideal Exclusive 24kW

Statistic
Ideal Exclusive 24kW
ErP rating (heat & water)
AA
Decibels
45
ErP efficiency
92%
Kilowatts
24
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
26
Size (mm)
700 x 395 x 285
Weight (kg)
30.85
Price
£578.26

Information updated in August 2019.

Best central heating boiler: Viessmann Vitodens 200-W (35kW)

Statistic
Viessmann Vitodens 200-W
ErP rating (heat & water)
AA
Decibels
51
ErP efficiency
98%
Kilowatts
35
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
<39
Size (mm)
850 x 450 x 360
Weight (kg)
48
Price
£1,645.47

Information updated in August 2019.

Best budget central heating boiler: Viessmann Vitodens 050-W (29kW)

Statistic
Viessmann Vitodens 050-W
ErP rating (heat & water)
AA
Decibels
45
ErP efficiency
97.6%
Kilowatts
29
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
39
Size (mm)
707 x 400 x 350
Weight (kg)
37
Price
£829.18

Information updated in August 2019.

Best system boiler: Viessmann Vitodens 100-W (35kW)

Statistic
Viessmann Vitodens 100-W
ErP rating (heat & water)
A
Decibels
49
ErP efficiency
97%
Kilowatts
35
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
<39
Size (mm)
700 x 400 x 350
Weight (kg)
37
Price
£1,153.38

Information updated in August 2019.

Best budget system boiler: Ideal Logic+ 15kW

Statistic
Ideal Logic+ 15kW
ErP rating (heat & water)
A
Decibels
44
ErP efficiency
93%
Kilowatts
15
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
24
Size (mm)
700 x 395 x 278
Weight (kg)
26.2
Price
£790.25

Information updated in August 2019.

Best oil boiler: Grant VortexBlue Internal 36

Statistic
Grant VortexBlue Internal 36
ErP rating (heat & water)
A
Decibels
53.7
ErP efficiency
94.6%
Kilowatts
36
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
74
Size (mm)
900 x 470 x 603
Weight (kg)
144
Price
£2,107.98

Information updated in August 2019.

Best budget oil boiler: Grant Vortex Pro 15-21

Statistic
Grant Vortex Pro 15-21
ErP rating (heat & water)
A
Decibels
49.6
ErP efficiency
90.8%
Kilowatts
21
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
180.4
Size (mm)
855 x 348 x 566
Weight (kg)
97
Price
£1,283.07

Information updated in August 2019.

Best electric boiler: EHC Fusion Comet 14.4KW

Statistic
EHC Fusion Comet 14.4KW
ErP rating (heat & water)
D
Decibels
Negligible
ErP efficiency
100%
Kilowatts
14.4
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
Negligible
Size (mm)
710 x 418 x 252
Weight (kg)
25
Price
£1,055.74

Information updated in August 2019.

Best budget electric boiler: Advance Appliances eGlow 6kW

Statistic
Advance Appliances eGlow 6kW
ErP rating (heat & water)
C
Decibels
Negligible
ErP efficiency
100%
Kilowatts
6
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
Negligible
Size (mm)
500 x 400 x 167
Weight (kg)
11
Price
£658.70

Information updated in August 2019.

Best conventional boiler: Ideal Evomax 40kW

Statistic
Ideal Evomax 40kW
ErP rating (heat & water)
A
Decibels
53
ErP efficiency
96.2%
Kilowatts
40
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
39.1
Size (mm)
850 x 360 x 500
Weight (kg)
49
Price
£2,518.98

Information updated in August 2019.

Best budget conventional boiler: Baxi 212 Heat

Statistic
Baxi 212 Heat
ErP rating (heat & water)
A
Decibels
32
ErP efficiency
93%
Kilowatts
12
mg/kWh of nitrogen oxides
18
Size (mm)
625 x 370 x 270
Weight (kg)
19.5
Price
£724.92

Information updated in August 2019.

Best biomass boiler: Grant Spira 36kW

Statistic
Grant Spira 36kW
ErP rating (heat & water)
A+
ErP efficiency
93.1%
Kilowatts
36
Size (mm)
1535 x 1129 x 1129
Weight (kg)
338.5
Price
£11,431

Information updated in August 2019.

Best budget biomass boiler: Windhager FireWIN Klassik

Statistic
Windhager FireWIN Klassik
ErP rating (heat & water)
A++
ErP efficiency
94.1%
Kilowatts
12
Size (mm)
530 x 691 x 1217
Weight (kg)
218
Price
£9,149.99

Information updated in August 2019.


The next step: compare boilers

As you’ve seen, there are many types of boilers. Whether or not you go for the Viessmann Vitodens 200-W will depend on what size boiler you need, what kind of home you have, and which fuel type matches your location, budget, and wishes.

We’ve laid out the best boilers in 2019 for you, and advised you about how to pick the right boiler. The next step is yours. You’re ready, so go forth and choose the boiler that matches you and your household’s needs. If you’d like to easily compare quotes, you can fill in this form and get a headstart.

Josh Jackman Editor

Josh is The Eco Experts’ main man for home security, smart devices, and boilers. If it can make your life better and help the environment, he’s on it.