Conservatory Prices UK: How Much Do They Cost in 2018?

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A new conservatory will cost between £4,500 and £20,000

The cheapest type of conservatory is a lean-to

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You want to buy a conservatory? Great, that’ll be one hundred pounds and fifty pence exactly please. If only the answer to the question “how much does a conservatory cost?” was that simple (and if only you could get a conservatory for £100.50).

If you’ve been researching prices you’ve probably already found that there’s no straight answer, because the cost depends on so many variables. But help is at hand – we’re here to tell you what those variables are and give you a rough idea of how much you’re likely to have to pay.

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conservatory prices

What’s in This Guide to Conservatory Prices?

Head straight to the sections you’re interested in by clicking on the links below.


Conservatory Prices Fitted: How Much Do Different Styles Cost?

Despite the myriad of factors at play, we’ve done our research and come up with price ranges for different types of conservatory. As a whole, the price range for conservatories is generally between £4,500 and £20,000, depending on everything from the doors to the roofing material. We explore what can affect the price of a conservatory a little later on.

Style of Conservatory
Price Range
Lean-to
£4,500 to £10,500
Edwardian
£5,750 to £16,000
Victorian
£6,500 to £15,500
Gable fronted
£6,500 to £16,000
P-shaped
£7,750 to £16,500

 


Conservatory Prices by Style, Size and Material

Lean-to Conservatory Costs

A lean-to conservatory is square or rectangular, with a roof that slopes down away from the house. It is the simplest and most inexpensive type of conservatory.

Lean-to conservatory with dwarf walls:

Size
Roof Material
Typical Price
3.5m x 2m
Polycarbonate
£7,000 to £8,000
3.5m x 2m
Glass
£7,500 to £8,500
3.5m x 2.5m
Polycarbonate
£8,000 to £9,500
3.5m x 2.5m
Glass
£8,500 to £10,000
4m x 2m
Polycarbonate
£7,500 to £9,000
4m x 2m
Glass
£8,000 to £9,500
4m x 2.5m
Polycarbonate
£9,000 to £10,000
4m x 2.5m
Glass
£9,500 to £10,500

Fully glazed uPVC lean-to conservatory:

Size
Roof Material
Typical Price
3.5m x 2m
Polycarbonate
£6,000 to £7,000
3.5m x 2m
Glass
£6,500 to £7,500
3.5m x 2.5m
Polycarbonate
£7,000 to £8,000
3.5m x 2.5m
Glass
£7,500 to £8,500
4m x 2m
Polycarbonate
£6,500 to £7,500
4m x 2m
Glass
£7,000 to £8,000
4m x 2.5m
Polycarbonate
£7,500 to £8,500
4m x 2.5m
Glass
£8,000 to £9,000

uPVC lean-to replacement conservatory cost, with no base work:

Size
Roof Material
Typical Price
3.5m x 2m
Polycarbonate
£4,500 to £5,000
3.5m x 2m
Glass
£4,750 to £5,250
3.5m x 2.5m
Polycarbonate
£5,000 to £5,500
3.5m x 2.5m
Glass
£5,500 to £6,000
4m x 2m
Polycarbonate
£4,750 to £5,250
4m x 2m
Glass
£5,000 to £5,750
4m x 2.5m
Polycarbonate
£5,000 to £5,750
4m x 2.5m
Glass
£5,750 to £6,250

Edwardian Conservatory Costs

Edwardian conservatories are square or rectangular, with flat sides and a sloping roof. The roof has several faces, unlike a lean-to conservatory, where the roof only has one, so an Edwardian conservatory looks like a miniature house.

uPVC Edwardian conservatory with dwarf walls:

Size
Roof Material
Typical Price
3.5m x 3.5m
Polycarbonate
£9,000 to £11,000
3.5m x 3.5m
Glass
£9,500 to £11,000
3.5m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£11,500 to £12,500
3.5m x 4m
Glass
£12,000 to £13,500
4m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£13,500 to £15,000
4m x 4m
Glass
£14,500 to £16,000

Fully glazed uPVC Edwardian conservatory:

Size
Roof Material
Typical Price
3.5m x 3.5m
Polycarbonate
£8,000 to £9,000
3.5m x 3.5m
Glass
£8,500 to £9,500
3.5m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£9,500 to £11,000
3.5m x 4m
Glass
£10,500 to £11,500
4m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£11,500 to £13,000
4m x 4m
Glass
£12,500 to £14,000

uPVC Edwardian replacement conservatory cost, with no base work:

Size
Roof Material
Typical Price
3.5m x 3.5m
Polycarbonate
£5,750 to £6,500
3.5m x 3.5m
Glass
£6,250 to £7,000
3.5m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£6,500 to £7,500
3.5m x 4m
Glass
£7,500 to £8,500
4m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£7,750 to £8,750
4m x 4m
Glass
£8,500 to £9,750

Victorian Conservatory Costs

A Victorian conservatory has straight sides and a bay window at the end, and a steeply pitched and often ornate roof. The bay window usually has 3 or 5 sides.

uPVC Victorian conservatory with dwarf walls:

Size
Roof Material
Typical Price
3.5m x 3.5m
Polycarbonate
£11,000 to £12,500
3.5m x 3.5m
Glass
£12,000 to £13,500
3.5m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£12,000 to £13,500
3.5m x 4m
Glass
£13,000 to £14,500
4m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£13,000 to £14,500
4m x 4m
Glass
£13,500 to £15,500

Fully glazed uPVC Victorian conservatory:

Size
Roof Material
Typical Price
3.5m x 3.5m
Polycarbonate
£9,500 to £11,000
3.5m x 3.5m
Glass
£10,500 to £11,500
3.5m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£10,500 to £11,500
3.5m x 4m
Glass
£11,000 to £12,500
4m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£11,000 to £12,500
4m x 4m
Glass
£12,000 to £13,500

uPVC Victorian replacement conservatory cost, with no base work:

Size
Roof Material
Typical Price
3.5m x 3.5m
Polycarbonate
£6,500 to £7,500
3.5m x 3.5m
Glass
£7,500 to £8,500
3.5m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£7,000 to £8,000
3.5m x 4m
Glass
£7,750 to £8,750
4m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£7,500 to £8,500
4m x 4m
Glass
£8,500 to £9,500

Gable Fronted Conservatory Costs

A gable fronted conservatory has a high roof which doesn’t slope backwards at the front but stands upright, giving a feeling of height.

uPVC gable fronted conservatory with dwarf walls:

Size
Roof Material
Typical Price
3.5m x 3.5m
Polycarbonate
£11,500 to £13,000
3.5m x 3.5m
Glass
£12,500 to £14,000
3.5m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£12,750 to £14,250
3.5m x 4m
Glass
£13,500 to £15,000
4m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£13,750 to £15,250
4m x 4m
Glass
£14,500 to £16,000

uPVC gable fronted replacement conservatory cost, with no base work:

Size
Roof Material
Typical Price
3.5m x 3.5m
Polycarbonate
£6,500 to £7,500
3.5m x 3.5m
Glass
£7,500 to £8,500
3.5m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£7,000 to £8,000
3.5m x 4m
Glass
£8,000 to £9,000
4m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£7,500 to £8,500
4m x 4m
Glass
£8,500 to £9,500

P-shaped Conservatory Costs

P-shaped conservatories are shaped as the name suggests!

uPVC P-shaped conservatory with dwarf walls:

Size
Roof Material
Typical Price
3.5m x 3.5m
Polycarbonate
£12,500 to £14,000
3.5m x 3.5m
Glass
£13,000 to £14,750
3.5m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£13,500 to £15,000
3.5m x 4m
Glass
£14,000 to £15,500
4m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£14,250 to £15,750
4m x 4m
Glass
£15,000 to £16,500

uPVC P-shaped replacement conservatory cost, with no base work:

Size
Roof Material
Typical Price
3.5m x 3.5m
Polycarbonate
£7,750 to £8,750
3.5m x 3.5m
Glass
£8,250 to £9,250
3.5m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£8,250 to £9,250
3.5m x 4m
Glass
£8,750 to £9,750
4m x 4m
Polycarbonate
£8,750 to £9,750
4m x 4m
Glass
£9,500 to £10,500

Select what type of conservatory you’d like to get a bespoke conservatory quote for your home

 


What Will Affect the Cost of My Conservatory?

First of all, there are the different choices you can make about the conservatory itself:

  • Size: a bigger conservatory will cost more.
  • Design: the more complicated the design, the more the conservatory will cost. Higher roofs are likely to cost more because of the extra headroom. Other design features, such as cresting, will also affect the price.
  • The material: conservatories can be made from uPVC, timber or aluminium or a combination of 2 materials, which is known as a composite conservatory. uPVC is the best value option – wood can cost almost twice as much.
  • The roof material: you can choose to have either a transparent roof or a solid roof, and there are several options for each. Check out our conservatory roofing page to find out more.
  • Did You Know?

    Coloured uPVC, or uPVC with a woodgrain finish, is around 10 to 15% more expensive than white uPVC.

  • The colour: you can choose various colours other than white for your conservatory, including black, cream, green, brown and grey; you can also have one colour inside and a different colour outside. This will add to the cost whether you opt for timber, aluminium or uPVC. Coloured uPVC, or uPVC with a woodgrain finish, is around 10 to 15% more expensive than white uPVC.
  • The windows: every window that opens will push up the price, as windows that open are more complicated than windows that don’t. The type of window you choose (such as casement or tilt and turn) will also affect the price – casement windows tend to be the cheapest.
  • Roof windows: your conservatory will need to be properly ventilated to prevent a build-up of condensation and mould, particularly in the roof. The most obvious way to do this is through opening roof windows. Roof windows can make a difference to whether the conservatory is usable all year round.
  • The glass: the more energy efficient your glass, or the more work involved in making it, the more it will cost.
  • The door: the bigger and more complex the door, the more expensive it will be. Standard doors will cost less than French, patio, tilt and turn, tilt and slide or bifold doors, which are usually the most expensive option.
  • Building regulation approval: whether you need to apply for planning permission or building regulations approval. See below for more details.

Then there will be these factors affecting the cost of the building work itself:

  • Whether you have an old conservatory that needs to be demolished.
  • Anything that needs to be moved, such as a boiler flue, pipe or garden tap. Underground utilities, such as power cables, drains, pipes or manholes will complicate matters as alternative access to them will need to be provided. You’ll need permission from your wastewater company if you’re building within 3 metres of a sewer.
  • Type of foundations: if you have poor soil, or trees nearby, the conservatory foundations may need to be deeper than normal.
  • Any work that needs to be done on your home, such as the creation of a doorway.
  • Type of walls: you can choose whether your conservatory is all glass or has dwarf walls – low brick walls at the base which the glass sits on. Dwarf walls will improve both energy efficiency and security and they will cost roughly £125 per metre.
  • Type of floor: do you want stone, ceramic tiles, wood, vinyl or carpet? Wood will be warm in winter (and expensive); tiles will be cool in summer. You can also get natural floorings such as seagrass and sisal; the latter is more expensive but available in a wide range of colours and textures.
  • Type of heating: the 2 options are usually radiators or underfloor heating. The more radiators you have, the higher the cost will be. Underfloor heating can be either electric or water based; electric heating is easier to install and repair, as there are no underfloor pipes, whereas a water-based system is more expensive to install but more efficient, so cheaper to run. You may also want air conditioning or a ceiling fan. Blinds can help to regulate the temperature as well as allowing you a bit of privacy.
  • Electrics: how many sockets, lights, switches and TV points do you want?
  • Landscaping: work on the patio, decking, new steps – these will all cost extra.
  • The installer you use: different installers will have different rates.

 


Getting Conservatory Quotes

The only way to get an accurate price for your conservatory is to get an installer to visit your home and do a site survey and consultation. Definitely avoid any installer who tries to skip this bit – we’ve shown above how many things they will need to take into consideration, so there’s no way you can get a sensible price over the phone or online.

We always advise getting quotes from at least 3 installers. These should be in writing and itemised so it is clear exactly what you’re paying for.

Any company you consider should be registered with at least 1 major trade body:

FENSA and CERTASS members are vetted to make sure they are competent and financially stable; they are required to comply with certain standards of quality and customer service, and have their work inspected annually. Their work is also covered by an insurance backed guarantee, which means that if something goes wrong within your guarantee period and your installer has gone out of business, another accredited workman will come out to fix it for free.

Ask for references so you can talk to previous customers, and judge each company on its own merits – don’t assume that the lowest price is the best deal or that the highest price means the best quality. Check the manufacturer’s guarantee on the products the company offers – ideally, it should be at least 10 years.

Deposits

You should expect to pay between 25 and 30% of the cost of your conservatory as a deposit. If your installer is asking for more than half the cost upfront, you should ask why. Only ever pay the balance of the cost when you are completely satisfied with the work.

FENSA and CERTASS members are required to offer deposit protection.

 


DIY Conservatories

DIY conservatories, as the name suggests, are conservatories that you build yourself. They are very inexpensive, costing in some cases less than £1,000, but there is a reason for this: the quality of the materials isn’t always very good, and you’ll be installing it yourself.

This means there is no site survey to check it’s actually okay to build, no building or conservatory expertise (which is important – a small error when measuring or building the base can mean your conservatory won’t fit!) and no guarantee, which means that you’ll need to fix anything that goes wrong at your own expense. You’ll also have to deal with the building and planning regulations side of things yourself.

It’s also worth remembering that a good quality conservatory will add to the value of your house – around 10% – so it is sensible to invest properly in your conservatory if you want to recoup the money when you sell.

 


Conservatory Planning Permission and Building Regulations

Planning Permission

You don’t usually need planning permission for a conservatory; it’s considered a permitted development as long as it meets certain requirements.

You can find the full list of requirements on the government’s planning portal website but the main ones are:

  • The conservatory should not jut out towards the road at the front or side. So in practice this usually means it should be at the back of the house.
  • The house must not have been extended already.
  • No more than half the land around the house is built on (this doesn’t just include the conservatory, but outbuildings like sheds).
  • The conservatory isn’t higher than the roof of the house or more than 4 metres high; 3 metres high if it’s within 2 metres of the edge of your property.
  • The conservatory doesn’t jut out from the back of the house by more than 3 metres for a semi-detached or terraced house, or 4 metres for a detached house. These limits have actually been temporarily extended until May 2019 to 6 metres and 8 metres respectively, though if your conservatory exceeds the normal 3 metres and 4 metre limits you will need to consult your neighbours through the government’s Neighbour Consultation Scheme.

These rules apply to most houses. There are different rules for flats, maisonettes or houses which have been converted. There are also more restrictions if you live in a conservation area, a listed building or on protected land, or if there is any other restriction on developing your property, such as a planning condition or Article 4 direction.

If you do need to apply for planning permission, don’t be tempted not to do so: the council can make you have your conservatory knocked down if it finds out.

Building Regulations

Building regulations, which ensure buildings meet health, safety, security and environmental standards, are a separate matter from planning permission. They do not normally apply to conservatories as long as:

  • The conservatory is at ground level.
  • It is less than 30 square metres.
  • It is separated from the rest of your house by external quality windows, doors and walls. If you want to remove the doors or wall linking the conservatory to your house, or create or alter a doorway, you will have to apply for building regulations approval.
  • It has its own independent heating system.
  • All the glass and electrics comply with building regulations.

In Scotland, the rules are called building warrants instead of building regulations, and are slightly different.

You can expect to pay around £180 if you need to apply for building regulations approval. Any reputable installer will be completely conversant with planning laws and building regulations and able to advise you, and many companies will take care of it all for you, sometimes for no extra cost.

All FENSA and CERTASS installers are required to be able to certify their own work as compliant with building regulations, which means you don’t have to have it inspected by the council.

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Fran Whittaker-Wood Editor

Fran is The Eco Experts’ resident solar panel and double glazing oracle She loves orangutans and is passionate about protecting the planet’s rainforests from the unsustainable production of palm oil. And minstrels.